General Article

4 Career Paths for Biomedical Engineers

As an industry, biomedical engineering has been on the rise for decades – and for good reason. Thanks to biomedical engineers, game-changing breakthroughs have been made in the fields of assistive technology, artificial intelligence and medical imaging. However, like other types of engineering, biomedical engineering is not a one-size-fits-all affair. There are a number of jobs someone with a biomedical engineering degree can pursue, many of which have enviable starter salaries. Anyone considering a future in the aforementioned field should read up on the following career paths.

1. Genetic Engineering

Biomedical engineers who want to make scientific breakthroughs and learn more about the human body should consider genetic engineering. Genetic engineers carefully study cellular activity in order to better understand the progression of certain diseases. This ultimately provides valuable information on combating these diseases and stopping their progression before a point of no return is reached.

2. Biomaterial Engineering

As a biomaterial engineer, you’ll be responsible for developing and refining materials that are safe for human consumption. Depending on where you work, the materials you develop may be used in medications, foods, grooming products and artificial implants. Unsurprisingly, these materials must also be devoid of toxins and carcinogenic properties. Furthermore, there’s no shortage of companies eager to hire skilled biomaterial engineering. Whether you’re interested in working in cosmetics, food production or pharmaceuticals, you’re sure to find an abundance of employment options.

3. Medical Imaging

Biomedical engineers who specialize in medical imaging create devices that enable doctors to see the inside of the human body. These devices include x-rays, MRIs and small cameras that are able to provide doctors with accurate, easy-to-read images while posing minimal risk to patients. Engineers who aspire to improve the accuracy of imaging devices should consider pursuing this line of work.

4. Orthopedic Engineering

As the name suggests, orthopedic engineering refers to the creation of implants that pertain to joints, muscles, bones and ligaments. Although some of these implants are designed to work in cooperation with existing tissue, many of them are created for the purpose of replacing ligaments, joints and bones.

There’s little wonder as to why so many engineering students are interested in the biomedical field. It’s important to note, however, that biomedical engineering is a broad term that encompasses a wide array of career paths. Budding biomedical engineers curious about the field’s most attractive job options are urged to consider genetic, biomaterial, medical and orthopedic engineering.